Author: Smriti

A wave is defined as a disturbance that propagates through a medium from one point to another. In physics, there are many different forms of waves. Despite the fact that they have a lot in common, they have particular behaviors and characteristics that set them apart. Waves in physics are classified into three kinds based on the particle of motion and energy direction: Electromagnetic waves, Mechanical waves, and Matter waves. Electromagnetic Waves Electromagnetic waves are made up of disturbances that can travel through space without the use of a medium. Light, for example, is an example of an electromagnetic wave.…

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When a substance absorbs electromagnetic radiation, electrically charged particles are emitted from or within it, causing the photoelectric effect. The ejection of electrons from a metal plate when light falls on it is a common definition of the effect. The radiant energy may be infrared, visible, or ultraviolet light, X-rays, or gamma rays; the substance could be a solid, liquid, or gas; and the released particles could be ions (electrically charged atoms or molecules) or electrons. Because of the puzzling concerns, it raised about the nature of light—particle vs wavelike behaviour—the phenomena were vitally important in the development of modern…

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Lightning is a discharge of electricity created by imbalances between storm clouds and the earth or inside the clouds themselves. The majority of lightning strikes within clouds. What Causes Lightning? In the United States, lightning is one of the most common weather-related causes of death and injury. Most people are unaware that they can be struck by lightning even if the thunderstorm’s centre is 10 miles (16 kilometres) distant and the sky is clear. Lightning is merely an electrical discharge – a “spark” or “flash” as charged regions in the atmosphere briefly equalize themselves through this discharge. It is a…

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The distance between each of the eight planets in our Solar System will vary depending on where each planet is around the Sun in its orbit. The distance can also vary considerably depending on the time of year. Distance Between Planets of the Solar System The key reason the planets change their distance is because of elliptic orbits. For example, the distance between planet Mercury and Earth will range from the nearest point of 77 million km to the farthest point of 222 million km. The distances between the planets are significantly different depending on their location on their orbit…

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Space is full of mysteries and scientists would probably need multiple lives to research on every discovery humans make and the opportunities space provides. Here is a list of those mysteries that will blow your mind. 1. Space Smells like Burnt Meat or a Blacksmith Workshop Astronauts who have gone on spacewalks talk regularly about the exceedingly strange scent about space. While they’re actually bobbing in it, they can’t smell it, because their space interiors just smell plastic-y. But they get a solid, distinctive sniff of the final frontier after walking back into the space station and removing their helmets.…

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Although most of us are trapped on planet Earth, we are lucky enough to have an atmosphere that is relatively clear. This allows us to look up into the sky and watch changes. The ancients observed planets roaming across the sky, with occasional guests: comets. Thousands of years ago most believed our fate was governed by the stars. Now, however, on the planets, asteroids and comets close to the earth, we can see science at work.  With its alien planets, strange moons and weird phenomena that are so out-of-this-world they elude explanation, a solar system is an odd place. Scientists…

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Black holes are among the Universe’s strangest things. They are massive mass collections with such strong gravity that nothing, not even light, can escape. Stellar-mass and supermassive black holes are the most common types of black holes whereas primordial black holes are the smallest of black holes that range from the size of an atom to the mass of a mountain. Stellar-mass black holes are created when massive stars explode, leaving a black hole with only a few suns mass behind it. Supermassive black holes exist in cores of galaxies and typically hold the equal mass of millions of suns.…

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Stars are massive celestial bodies made mainly of hydrogen and helium that produce light and heat inside their cores from the churning nuclear forges. Apart from our sun, all light-years from Earth are the points of light we see in the sky. Facts About Stars These are the building blocks of galaxies, billions of which exist in the universe. How many stars actually exist is difficult to say, but astronomers believe that there are about 300 billion in our Milky Way galaxy alone. The Sun is the closest star to Earth. 1. Stars Aren’t Next to Each Other Binary star…

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Nebula (plural, “nebulae”) is a Latin word meaning “cloud;” these majestic and graceful objects are indeed cloud-like. Nebulae are composed of interstellar ice, hydrogen, helium, and other gasses, instead of being packed with water vapour like clouds on Earth. Interesting Facts about Nebula They don’t seem to have much mass, like a cloud on Earth. If weighed in kilograms, one as large as earth will weigh just about as much as a cat. Let us uncover some interesting facts about Nebula.  1. Formation Nebulae are usually formed in the interstellar medium by a gravitational collapse of gasses. The falling particles…

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Meteors are a tiny body of matter, coming from outer space and reaching the Earth. It appears as a line of light in the sky, as a result of friction. Sometimes an enjoyable experience can be observing meteor showers or finding a meteorite. A meteorite is a natural phenomenon that falls and retains impact with the earth, originating in outer space. Interesting Facts About Meteors On Earth there are meteorites, but they can also be found in other planets and celestial bodies like Mars and the moon. Many meteorites originate from meteoroids, but others may also come from asteroid impacts.…

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